JavaScript

JavaScript is a programming language commonly used in web development. It was originally developed by Netscape as a means to add dynamic and interactive elements to websites. While JavaScript is influenced by Java, the syntax is more similar to C and is based on ECMAScript, a scripting language developed by Sun Microsystems.

JavaScript is a client-side scripting language, which means the source code is processed by the client's web browser rather than on the web server. This means JavaScript functions can run after a webpage has loaded without communicating with the server. For example, a JavaScript function may check a web form before it is submitted to make sure all the required fields have been filled out. The JavaScript code can produce an error message before any information is actually transmitted to the server.

Like server-side scripting languages, such as PHP and ASP, JavaScript code can be inserted anywhere within the HTML of a webpage. However, only the output of server-side code is displayed in the HTML, while JavaScript code remains fully visible in the source of the webpage. It can also be referenced in a separate .JS file, which may also be viewed in a browser.

Below is an example of a basic JavaScript function that adds two numbers. The function is called with the parameters 7 and 11. If the code below were included in the HTML of a webpage, it would display the text "18" in an alert box.

<script>
  function sum(a,b)
  {
    return a + b;
  }
  var total = sum(7,11);
  alert(total);
</script>

JavaScript functions can be called within <script> tags or when specific events take place. Examples include onClick, onMouseDown, onMouseUp, onKeyDown, onKeyUp, onFocus, onBlur, onSubmit, and many others. While standard JavaScript is still used for performing basic client-side functions, many web developers now prefer to use JavaScript libraries like jQuery to add more advanced dynamic elements to websites.

Updated August 8, 2014

Definitions by TechTerms.com

The definition of JavaScript on this page is an original TechTerms.com definition. If you would like to reference this page or cite this definition, you can use the green citation links above.

The goal of TechTerms.com is to explain computer terminology in a way that is easy to understand. We strive for simplicity and accuracy with every definition we publish. If you have feedback about the JavaScript definition or would like to suggest a new technical term, please contact us.

Want to learn more tech terms? Subscribe to the daily or weekly newsletter and get featured terms and quizzes delivered to your inbox.

Sign up for the free TechTerms Newsletter

How often would you like to receive an email?

You can unsubscribe or change your frequency setting at any time using the links available in each email.

Questions? Please contact us.